The Reality of Climate Change.

The global mean temperature is rising at a rate that, if unmitigated, within the next 20 – 30 years will render our planet increasingly hostile to life as we know it. 99% of scientific research indicates that the warming temperatures are out of scale due to human activity like factory farming and the use of fossil fuels. A warming Earth disturbs weather, people and animals by raising sea levels, intensifying droughts, heat waves and winter storms, reducing crop growing areas, killing coral reefs and other critical species as well as creating ever increasing human and social impact. While some powerful governments question the realities of climate change or delay taking action due to special interests, island nations and other vulnerable populations of the world bear the ominous responsibility of dealing with some of it’s most damaging effects. This is despite the fact that small nations, like those in the Caribbean, contribute so little to the green house gases which are at the root of climate change.

Our planet is increasingly experiencing dramatic climate and weather extremes. The recent hurricanes in the Caribbean, Central and North America are no exception. The clearly documented changes in the earths temperatures and rising sea levels create conditions that augment the intensity of hurricanes. Simply put, warmer oceans make stronger hurricanes and rising sea levels create much more damaging storm surge when they make landfall. This makes the human and environmental impact of naturally occurring hurricanes to be much more destructive.

The islands of the Caribbean may be among the most vulnerable places but this is a planetary challenge. Many countries of the world have taken steps in establishing policy and action to mitigate carbon emissions and other damaging activity. Major cities like New York, Miami and London are seeing the effects first hand and are implementing resiliency measures. However many of the largest carbon emitters on the planet (industrialized nations) are still slow or even regressive in enacting the measures needed to mitigate the effects. Much more action is needed to slow the growing impact of these man made effects on our planets delicate climate balance – from individual and community activity to national and global policy. Consider taking the pledge to learn and do more about climate change, there are many ways to take action whether that be through individual consumption choices or by holding your government representatives accountable to set effective policies and enact the needed laws.

Make a lasting difference in the Caribbean

The Reality of Climate Change.

The global mean temperature is rising at a rate that, if unmitigated, within the next 20 – 30 years will render our planet increasingly hostile to life as we know it. 99% of scientific research indicates that the warming temperatures are out of scale due to human activity like factory farming and the use of fossil fuels. A warming Earth disturbs weather, people and animals by raising sea levels, intensifying droughts, heat waves and winter storms, reducing crop growing areas, killing coral reefs and other critical species as well as creating ever increasing human and social impact. While some powerful governments question the realities of climate change or delay taking action due to special interests, island nations and other vulnerable populations of the world bear the ominous responsibility of dealing with some of it’s most damaging effects. This is despite the fact that small nations, like those in the Caribbean, contribute so little to the green house gases which are at the root of climate change.

Our planet is increasingly experiencing dramatic climate and weather extremes. The recent hurricanes in the Caribbean, Central and North America are no exception. The clearly documented changes in the earths temperatures and rising sea levels create conditions that augment the intensity of hurricanes. Simply put, warmer oceans make stronger hurricanes and rising sea levels create much more damaging storm surge when they make landfall. This makes the human and environmental impact of naturally occurring hurricanes to be much more destructive.

The islands of the Caribbean may be among the most vulnerable places but this is a planetary challenge. Many countries of the world have taken steps in establishing policy and action to mitigate carbon emissions and other damaging activity. Major cities like New York, Miami and London are seeing the effects first hand and are implementing resiliency measures. However many of the largest carbon emitters on the planet (industrialized nations) are still slow or even regressive in enacting the measures needed to mitigate the effects. Much more action is needed to slow the growing impact of these man made effects on our planets delicate climate balance – from individual and community activity to national and global policy. Consider taking the pledge to learn and do more about climate change, there are many ways to take action whether that be through individual consumption choices or by holding your government representatives accountable to set effective policies and enact the needed laws.

Make a lasting difference in the Caribbean

…in a Nutshell

Climate change basically describes a long-term change in Earth’s weather patterns or climate. This change is now being recorded at an unprecedented rate. The global average temperature is now changing at a faster rate than it has in the past 1,000 years. The changes in climate are a result of the build-up of heat-trapping greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. This excessive build up is caused primarily by human activity like extracting and burning of fossil fuels, factory farming and processing of animal meat, deforestation and other activities.

Even a minimal rise in global temperatures can lead to wide spread effects on humans, animals and the environment. These effects have a significant impact on not only our way of life but our health, finances and the sustainability of life as we know it for future generations.

  • The climate is changing at an unprecedented rate throughout the 20th and 21st centuries.
  • This is directly related to human activity.
  • This kind of climate change is damaging, disruptive and unsustainable for human and animal populations as well as the environment.
  • We can make a difference. While the damage needed to cause significant future warming has already occurred, reduction in the emission of greenhouse gases can slow the effects. We can make personal choices about consumption and activity,
    moreover we can keep our governments responsible in setting laws and policies in place to aggressively address these issues.

…in a Nutshell

Climate change basically describes a long-term change in Earth’s weather patterns or climate. This change is now being recorded at an unprecedented rate. The global average temperature is now changing at a faster rate than it has in the past 1,000 years. The changes in climate are a result of the build-up of heat-trapping greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. This excessive build up is caused primarily by human activity like extracting and burning of fossil fuels, factory farming and processing of animal meat, deforestation and other activities.

Even a minimal rise in global temperatures can lead to wide spread effects on humans, animals and the environment. These effects have a significant impact on not only our way of life but our health, finances and the sustainability of life as we know it for future generations.

  • The climate is changing at an unprecedented rate throughout the 20th and 21st centuries.
  • This is directly related to human activity.
  • This kind of climate change is damaging, disruptive and unsustainable for human and animal populations as well as the environment.
  • We can make a difference. While the damage needed to cause significant future warming has already occurred, reduction in the emission of greenhouse gases can slow the effects. We can make personal choices about consumption and activity,
    moreover we can keep our governments responsible in setting laws and policies in place to aggressively address these issues.

The Caribbean in a changing climate

The Caribbean is exceptionally vulnerable to the effects of Climate Change. The geography of the islands renders entire populations exposed to rising sea levels as well as more frequent and severe drought and hurricanes. The United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization has reported that climate change will lead to more frequent and severe droughts in the Caribbean region, already home to seven of the world’s most water-stressed countries. The limitations of small economies make mitigation and recovery very challenging. Additionally in most of the islands the principal industries are Tourism and Agriculture, both of which can be halted by strong Hurricanes. For small island nations like those in the Caribbean the economic and non-economic damages and loss created by Climate Change are very real.

These small island nations face a very disproportionate share of the effects of climate change when considering that their contribution to greenhouse gasses are less than .01%. Despite limited capacity the islands are making efforts for adaption including rainwater harvesting, seawater desalinization, diversification of livelihoods, and improved emergency management.

The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Climate Change Centre has been established to plan the region’s response to climate change subsequently increasing its resilience. It’s policy is based on sustainable development,adaptation measures,reducing greenhouse gas emissions, reducing vunerabilities and promoting social, economic, and environmental benefits.

The Caribbean in a changing climate

The Caribbean is exceptionally vulnerable to the effects of Climate Change. The geography of the islands renders entire populations exposed to rising sea levels as well as more frequent and severe drought and hurricanes. The United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization has reported that climate change will lead to more frequent and severe droughts in the Caribbean region, already home to seven of the world’s most water-stressed countries. The limitations of small economies make mitigation and recovery very challenging. Additionally in most of the islands the principal industries are Tourism and Agriculture, both of which can be halted by strong Hurricanes.

These small island nations face a very disproportionate share of the effects of climate change when considering that their contribution to greenhouse gasses are less than .01%. Despite limited capacity the islands are making efforts for adaption including rainwater harvesting, seawater desalinization, diversification of livelihoods, and improved emergency management.

The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Climate Change Centre has been established to plan the region’s response to climate change subsequently increasing its resilience. It’s policy is based on sustainable development,adaptation measures,reducing greenhouse gas emissions, reducing vunerabilities and promoting social, economic, and environmental benefits.

What You Can Do

Action is needed. While many countries have taken steps in beginning to address carbon emissions and resilience there is so much more action needed to slow the damaging effects of climate change. Governments hold the power to make aggresive changes in policy and laws which can make the most significant difference. Many of the larger industrialized countries whose activities have played the biggest role in climate change have been slow or even regressive in taking effective action based on politics, economics and the bidding of special interests (i.e oil and gas industries).

We can make a difference by taking action. We can keep climate change in our discussions with each other and with our elected officials, our voices and our votes are the most powerful tools we have. We can also make personal choices by understanding and affecting our own carbon footprint – primarily our consumption of the products that are directly linked to climate change. The amount of fossil fuels, mass produced animal meat and products, water and energy we use all play a roll.

  • Speak up – let your elected officials know that you demand their focus on mitigating and preparing for the effects of climate change
  • Understand and calculate your own carbon footprint.
  • Eat the food you buy and make it less factory produced meat,poultry or fish
  • Choose to use renewable energy sources (wind, solar,geothermal, hydropower,biomass) and invest in energy efficiency
  • Reduce water waste
  • Choose to support the businesses and brands that are actively working toward improved energy efficiency, lower carbon emission and addressing the social and environmental implications of climate change

Reduce Your Carbon Footprint

Practice Your Politics

Stay informed

Take a Vacation

What You Can Do

Action is needed. While many countries have taken steps in beginning to address carbon emissions and resilience there is so much more action needed to slow the damaging effects of climate change. Governments hold the power to make aggresive changes in policy and laws which can make the most significant difference. Many of the larger industrialized countries whose activities have played the biggest role in climate change have been slow or even regressive in taking effective action based on politics, economics and the bidding of special interests (i.e oil and gas industries).

We can make a difference by taking action. We can keep climate change in our discussions with each other and with our elected officials, our voices and our votes are the most powerful tools we have. We can also make personal choices by understanding and affecting our own carbon footprint – primarily our consumption of the products that are directly linked to climate change. The amount of fossil fuels, mass produced animal meat and products, water and energy we use all play a roll.

  • Speak up – let your elected officials know that you demand their focus on mitigating and preparing for the effects of climate change
  • Understand your own carbon footprint.
  • Eat the food you buy and make it less factory produced meat,poultry or fish
  • Choose to use renewable energy sources (wind, solar,geothermal, hydropower,biomass) and invest in energy efficiency
  • Reduce water waste
  • Choose to support the businesses and brands that are actively working toward improved energy efficiency, lower carbon emission and addressing the social implications of climate change

Make the Pledge.

To help these islands recover one of the most important things you can give is your long term attention. Take the pledge to stay informed about the recovery and needs of these special places. Any help now or in the future can make a difference. Also consider promising to visit the Caribbean soon. These islands all depend on Tourism to survive. You can even simply pledge to learn more and do more about Climate Change, that helps us all. Take the pledge, share it with your friends and make a lasting difference.

Make the Pledge.

To help these islands recover one of the most important things you can give is your long term attention. Take the pledge to stay informed about the recovery and needs of these special places. Any help now or in the future can make a difference. Also consider promising to visit the Caribbean soon. These islands all depend on Tourism to survive. You can even simply pledge to learn more and do more about Climate Change, that helps us all. Take the pledge, share it with your friends and make a lasting difference.